Inspired By: Mid-Century Concrete

Inspired By: Mid-Century Concrete | Ty Pennington

I’ve always loved these Mid-Century concrete blocks and walls. I’m already a fan of geometric patterns in design, but these are more than just fancy cinder blocks. You mostly see them out west or down in Florida, and there’s actually a pretty cool explanation behind it.

Inspired By: Mid-Century Concrete | Ty Pennington

In the late 1950s when modern architecture started really taking off after WWII, these decorative blocks (before air conditioning can into play) were used as an attractive solution to keep homes and commercial buildings cool in hot weather.

Inspired By: Mid-Century Concrete | Ty Pennington

So instead of just looking awesome, these cinder blocks (aka breeze blocks) actually helped homes, offices, stores and restaurants located in hotter climates. You also often see them on the sides of buildings to filter out the harsh rays of the sun while still providing a view, creating that privacy everybody likes and again adding a natural cooling factor.

Inspired By: Mid-Century Concrete | Ty Pennington

Breeze blocks come in tons of different shapes, sizes and patterns, but all of them allow wind to come into a house, entryway, patio, business courtyard, etc.

Inspired By: Mid-Century Concrete | Ty Pennington

Modern design has also brought breeze blocks indoors.

Inspired By: Mid-Century Concrete | Ty Pennington

While they might not be used to cool down the home, they still allow flow of air and give the overall design of a room a funky geometric element.

Inspired By: Mid-Century Concrete | Ty Pennington

Inspired By: Mid-Century Concrete | Ty Pennington

Inspired By: Mid-Century Concrete | Ty Pennington

Designed for cooling, they are the coolest design element that is making a big come back today!

 

Photo Source: The Parker Palm Springs, Flickr, Decor Pad, Building the Ville, Houzz